Schrodinger’s Rabbit sound design & post-production

Happy New year to all those who read my blog! After a short break over the Christmas period (although I have been working on the animation on and off) everything is starting to come together.

After recording the sound prior to Christmas, the dialog was edited together with Foley, music and ambience added. I thought I’d give the new version of Logic a go for this project, Logic Pro X. Have to say I’ve been very impressed by the performance and the refreshed user interface. The learning curve if you have used Logic previously, is virtually non-existent as it’s so similar. Some menu settings have changed and others have been moved from obscure locations in Logic 9 to places in the UI in this version that are much easier to locate e.g flex time, automation, etc.

Importing audio stems

Importing audio stems

Anyway, enough of the technical stuff and onto the final mix. Step 1 was to import all the raw audio recordings of dialog into Logic and chop them into the component lines of dialog and edit together as per the script. As each piece of dialog was recorded at different times, it was important to get the timing right so the dialog sounded natural.

Dialog Arrangement in Logic X

Dialog Arrangement in Logic X

Location recordings were completed for a variety of different ambiences e.g. room tone for a lounge, pet shop, etc along with some sound effects e.g. lawnmower, doors, footsteps. I struggled to record car engine sounds to a good standard so used some of the stock (free) audio included within Logic. I found it easiest to sub-divide the audio with markers for each scene to help with the timings, as the audio was produced prior to the animation.  You can see in the screenshot below the process in action.

Completed audio edit

Completed audio edit

Once complete (this took a couple of days), the audio was mixed. I kept it very simple with just the use of compression, EQ and automation. This allowed full control of the mix. Some of the dialog naturally dips or rises, hence the use of light compression predominantly on the voices to even out the levels.

Automation in Logic Pro X

Automation in Logic Pro X

Logic Pro X Final Mix

Logic Pro X Final Mix

Once the final mix was complete this was bounced to a 48 kHz .wav file to be imported into Final Cut Pro X for the final video edit. Overall, I’m quite happy with the sound track for the piece. I’m not so sure about the animation so far, but that’s to come in a future blog update.

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